Kids


I love this tutorial from Balancing Beauty and Bedlam!  When I had my daughter almost 2 years ago I was trying to figure out how to make one of these and gave up.now pregnant with my 3rd and will have to give this a try for this one.  But really—are you ever too old for one of these???  Maybe I’ll still make one for her—they’re gorgeous!  Thank you Balancing Beauty and Bedlam!

Pottery Barn Inspired Bedroom Decor November 30, 2009 Hearing that a post has inspired both creativity and frugality in one of my readers delights me to no end. When Cara emailed me that she had some Pottery Barn inspired bedroom decor and had conquered a Pottery Barn chandelier for under $10, I was delighted that she shared the pictures. Her ideas can be fitted to any number of varying decorating tastes. I am in the process (yes, the process has been stalled on quite a few occasions) of finishing my girls’ room with a PB inspired butterfly theme. I can’t wait to show you how an entire room makeover can happen for under $100 (with furniture). This butterfly chandelier is a wonderful start. Here is the original inspiration from the Pottery Barn, which is no longer sold. Considering that this gorgeous Chapiz Chandelier is selling for $129 right now, I am guessing, the butterfly one would not have fit into my frugal bedroom decor category. But Cara’s sure does!! Let’s see how you can make one of these Pottery Barn inspired chandeliers for less than ten dollars. Your daughters will love you for it. Supplies: Embroidery Hoop (only the solid hoop is needed; the hoop I used is about 14in in diameter) Twine / String Ribbon (1/2 inch or so width) Ribbon (thin) Beads Card stock Paper (I used 3 colors) Butterfly Template or punch (I wanted my butterflies to be about 3 inches wide – larger than any of my punches – so I used this template from Martha Stewart. Hot Glue Gun Ribbon Punch (optional – this is a tool I use for scrapbooking that punches out two slits for ribbons to feed through) (1) Take the embroidery hoop and tie a grid across it with the strings. I chose to do three strings in each direction. (You can see the grid in image directly below). Make sure to tie the strings tights. (2) Using the hot glue gun, wrap the ribbon around the hoop until it is completely covered, periodically gluing it so that the ribbon stays put. Once the hoop is covered, add two ribbons criss-crossing for hanging. (3) Cut out your butterflies. I opted for 36 butterflies in dark pink, pale pink, and white. Cut slits in the middle of the butterflies just wide enough for the thin ribbon to feed through. You want a tight fit so that the butterflies stay put on the ribbon. I used a ribbon punch, but you cut also just use scissors. You could also try using an adhesive if you have trouble getting the butterflies to stay, though you might want to wait until the end and the butterflies are exactly where you want them (4) Start assembling the butterflies on the thin ribbon, threading a few beads on the bottom to help weight each strand. You can add as many butterflies on each strand as you like for your design. For the chandelier effect, have a longer string in the middle and gradually have shorter strand toward the outside. Based on the size of my butterflies, I opted for four butterflies on my center strand (tied to the middle point of the grid). Then I had 4 strands of three butterflies, 4 strands of two butterflies, and 12 strands of one butterfly. I then used to three beads at the end of each strand. As a hint, find someplace to balance the hoop so you can look at the strands as you attach them to the grid. That way, you can play with the length you want. Since I tend to do crafts on my living room floor while watching TV, I brought in two of my kitchen chairs and balanced the hoop between the seats. That let me keep shifting things until I achieved the look I wanted. (5) After you have attached all the strands to the grid and have everything set, clip any excess ribbon from where you tied the strands and go hang your chandelier I hope you have enjoyed this beautifully frugal way to decorate your girl’s room. I know I sure did.

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Here was another great article I found that I would like to keep on hand to have this information as we choose whether or not to selectively choose immunizations for our kids.  You can open up this PDF and save it to your computer for future reference A User-Friendly Vaccination Schedule.

Vaccinations can be such a sticky topic, one in which people are so passionate about—and often don’t even want to look at the other side (is it fear they might be wrong??).  I, as most others are, AM passionate about vaccines, however, it’s the alternatives that I’m passionate about- not supporting the pharmaceutical business that hasn’t even been fully tested (nor even willing to do so).  Anyway, I do love to read and learn up on these types of topics— I’m not trying to risk my children’s health or safety for heaven’s sake!  Here are a few sites I recently found that give great info. and even an alternative vaccine schedule (I may after all, choose SOME of the vaccines—do we really need one for chicken pox???—but just at a later time when my children’s systems can better handle them, as well as at a slower pace.)  So here is one from Generation Rescue, and I want to put their entire article here simply because I want to be able to have this information on hand, even if it were to become unavailable in the future–such valuable info:

Questioning the safety of vaccines is a taboo topic in the United States and many other countries. The pressure is on most pediatricians to always counsel that the “benefits outweigh the risks” when it comes to vaccinating children. Yet, most parents have heard about the legitimate concerns many parents have that vaccines may have triggered their children’s autism or other neurological disorders (“NDs”).

 

The growth in the number of vaccines given to our children in the last 20 years is rarely discussed in the media, despite a stunning chart like this one that shows a 260% increase in vaccines administered (were millions of children dying from deadly diseases 25 years ago? No, they weren’t.) Parents should know that vaccines are never tested for their “combination risk”, despite the fact that children may get as many as 6 vaccines in a single visit to the doctor. And, when it comes to vaccines, how can it be possible that one size fits all? What may present as no risks for one child may present enormous risks for another.

 

As a parent contemplating vaccinating their child, we would offer the following 3-point plan to try to minimize the potential risks from vaccines. (Please note that we are parents, not doctors. What follows is not medical advice, it is the opinion of parents. Anything written here should be reviewed with a qualified physician. We are not giving you medical advice nor are we qualified to do so.)

 

1. Take Precaution

 

• Consider delaying vaccines until your child is 18-24 months old.

• Do not vaccinate if your child is taking antibiotics.

• Consider no more than one vaccine per doctor’s visit.

• If you plan to get the MMR vaccine, ask your doctor to give it in three separate vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella.

• Consider giving high doses of Vitamin C (3,000-5,000 mg per day) on the day before, of, and after vaccination.

• With the measles vaccine (MMR), consider high doses of Vitamin A (5,000 IU or more) on the day before, of, and after vaccination.

• If your child experiences any developmental delays, stop vaccinating until you learn more.

• If your child has an adverse reaction to a vaccine, stop vaccinating until you learn more.

• Always ask to see the vaccine insert, and never accept a vaccine that uses the preservative Thimerosal (mercury). For a complete list of vaccines with Thimerosal, see the FDA’s website here. Note: most flu shots today still contain Thimerosal.

 

 

2. Consider delaying vaccines

 

In our favorite article on vaccines, A User-Friendly Vaccine Schedule, written by University of Washington surgeon Donald Miller, M.D., Dr. Miller makes a number of interesting observations including:

 

“Public health officials, however, have not proven that it is indeed safe to inject this many vaccines into infants. What’s more, they cannot explain why, concurrent with an increasing number of vaccinations, there has been an explosion of neurologic and immune system disorders in our nation’s children.”

 

And:

 

“New knowledge in neuroimmunology (the study of how the brain’s immune system works) raises serious questions about the wisdom of injecting vaccines in children less than two years of age.”

 

Dr. Miller’s recommendation: don’t start vaccinating your child until they turn two years old.

 

 

3. Consider an alternative schedule to the CDC’s current schedule

 

It really is shocking to look at the 1983 recommended vaccine schedule and compare it to 2008. Does a child really need so many more vaccines today? Quiz your doctor by asking them how many vaccines were on the schedule in the 1980s. We have found that most have no idea. Three potential alternative schedules to consider:

 

I. Listen to the Doctor (Our favorite)

Comment: Donald Miller, M.D., is a surgeon at the University of Washington. His article, A User-Friendly Vaccine Schedule, is summarized into this schedule.

II. Turn back the clock

Comment: This is the schedule from 1983. If it worked for kids then, why doesn’t it work for kids now?

III. Go Danish

Comment: Denmark is a first world country based in Western Europe. Their schedule appears far more reasonable than ours. They have also been reported to have a much lower rate of autism than the U.S. Do they know something we don’t?

 

 

A second disclaimer: Please note that we are parents, not doctors. What precedes is not medical advice, it is the opinion of parents. Anything written here should be reviewed with a qualified physician. We are not giving you medical advice nor are we qualified to do so.

 

Final thoughts and resources

 

The parents of Generation Rescue were once just like you. We trusted our pediatricians. We vaccinated our children according to the latest schedule from the CDC. Then, often times immediately following a vaccine visit, we watched our children change and descend into autism. The reason this organization and website exists is because we don’t want the same thing to happen to you and your child. Some things that we have learned that we want you to know include:

 

1. Vaccines are big business

 

As this recent Wall Street Journal article reported, Merck stands to generate as much as $2 billion in revenues per year for their new Gardasil vaccine for girls targeting Cervical cancer. For a company beaten down by the Vioxx scandal, Gardasil’s success is a very important initiative, which according to the article has caused the company to push the vaccine out the door using questionable marketing techniques while legitimate concerns about safety and efficacy still exist. (A January 2008 story that made headlines across Europe reported on the deaths of two teenage girls immediately after getting the Gardasil vaccine — we couldn’t find any U.S. media outlets that covered the story.)

 

Vaccine manufacturers are no different from other corporations: they want to sell more of whatever it is they make. Unfortunately, there is a revolving door between the policy-makers who determine the vaccine schedule and the pharmaceutical companies who make vaccines, as our own Congressional Committee on Government Reform reported in this document titled Conflicts of Interest in Vaccine Policy Making.

 

2. Vaccines have real documented risks and the U.S. Government knows this.

 

Vaccines have risks and parents are rarely told about these risks. Any pediatrician who represents that vaccines are “completely safe” is not presenting the facts. Many vaccines contain other toxic substances including ethylene glycol (antifreeze), phenol (a disinfectant dye), benzethonium chloride (a disinfectant), formaldehyde (a preservative and disinfectant), and aluminum (another known neuro-toxin). Further, some viruses used in vaccines are cultured in animal tissue including chicken albumin and monkey liver. Click here for a complete list of the foreign substances found in vaccines, and here for a sample of a poster made and sold by Dr. Tedd Koren summarizing vaccine ingredients.

 

The CDC maintains a database called the Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System or VAERS. This database keeps track of publicly reported adverse reactions to vaccines. In a ten year period (1991-2001), VAERS received 128,717 reports of adverse events, of which 14% were described as “serious” which means “death, life-threatening illness, hospitalization or prolongation of hospitalization, or permanent disability.”

 

The Federal Government maintains a National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program (VICP). Between 1990-2004, the VICP paid more than $900 million in restitution to persons injured by vaccines, and they provide a list of possible injuries by type of vaccine.

 

3. There are legitimate concerns over the efficacy of some vaccines.

 

Consider the flu vaccine as just one example of where there may be evidence that the vaccine does not work:

 

A recent study was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association touting the safety of flu vaccine. Nine of the studies authors had stated financial ties to vaccine manufacturers, and an additional four authors worked for the CDC. The study also stated: “It is also important to note that there is scant data on the efficacy and effectiveness of influenza vaccine in young children.”

 

On October 27, 2006, the British Medical Journal published an article also questioning the efficacy of the flu vaccine. The article noted: “Evidence from systematic reviews shows that inactivated vaccines [flu vaccines] have little or no effect on the effects measured. Little comparative evidence exists on the safety of these vaccines. Reasons for the current gap between policy and evidence are unclear, but given the huge resources involved, a re-evaluation should be urgently undertaken…The optimistic and confident tone of some predictions of viral circulation and of the impact of inactivated vaccines, which are at odds with the evidence, is striking.”

 

4. You can’t be forced to vaccinate your child or follow the CDC’s recommended immunization schedule.

 

Parents are often told that vaccinating their child is “required by law”. It is important for parents to understand what their rights are as all states offer either a philosophical or religious exemption from vaccinations. You have the right to design a vaccine program that is right for you and your child. Click here for more information.

 

5. AAP and MercuryThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has been perpetuating untruths about mercury for some time.  They have in many cases told the public that mercury has been taken out of vaccines since 2001.  This is not the case.  Today, 8 years later, there are still mercury containing vaccines in the pediatric and prenatal schedule.

In February, 2008 a great example of how the AAP attempted to manipulate the public into believing that vaccines did not have mercury in them was a letter to ABC trying to cancel the Eli Stone television show for wanting to tell a story about a family who won a vaccine-autism case in court.

 

The letter, written by the president of the American Academy of Pediatrics (you can view the letter here) ([ink to lettertoabc.pdf attached] calling for the cancellation of the show said:  “If ABC persists in airing the show, the AAP urges the network to include a disclaimer emphasizing: No mercury is used as a preservaitve in routinely offered childhood vaccines.”

 

At the time there were 5 vaccines commonly being used in the pediatric schedule as well as mercury containing vaccines in the prenatal schedule.

 

The AAP letter was false and even after direct communication from Generation Rescue the AAP would not retract or correct the information.  These tactics are common in communication from the American Academy of Pediatrics.  It appears they are more concerned about how to get the public to vaccinate than the actual truth.

 

Our letter to the AAP can be viewed here and the part about the mercury in vaccines is also below:

 

AAPs position about mercury in vaccines is not accurate.

In the letter to ABC the AAP wrote: “No mercury is used as a preservative in routinely offered childhood vaccinations.”

 

Mercury is still in 16 vaccines including 5 pediatric vaccines such as 3 flu shots, the HEP-B and the DtaP.

 

At best, this is similar to saying:

 

“No caffeine is used in coffee as a preservative.”

 

It is in there, just not as a preservative.  Parents are not concerned if mercury is in there as an adjuvant, or as manufacturing residue, or as an inexpensive antibacterial –they just want to know if it is in there.  Not stating that mercury is in 5 vaccines used for pediatrics is considered, by many, as deceitful.

 

What could have been written is something like “Mercury has been removed from many routinely offered childhood vaccines.” Or “Childhood mercury exposure from vaccines has been reduce by 65%”

 

The Truth About Mercury In Vaccines 

 

According the FDA’s website outlining vaccine administration for children (1) there is up to 300 picograms of mercury in the DtaP shot (Tripedia by Sanofi Pasteur, listed as the third item from the FDA website screen shot below)

 

and 25,000 picograms of mercury in one of the pediatric flu shots (Fluzone by Sanofi Pasteur)

 

and another pediatric flu shot has 12,500 picograms of mercury (Fluvirin by Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics Ltd)

 

and a third pediatric flu shot by the same company under the same name is said to be preservative free but has trace amounts of mercury.  The exact amount does not have to be published if they are under 100 picograms but in this case but trace amounts of mercury are higher than trace amounts allowed in orally ingested items but  in this case is being injected in a child.  How toxic this is may be debatable, but what is not debatable is that there is still some mercury in the vaccine.

 

Additionally the Hep-B vaccine has up to 500 picograms of mercury (Published in table 2 outside the pediatric section in of the FDA document but labeled for use for “pediatric/adolescent” use).  This vaccine is used in pediatrics as well.

 

If I was responsible for public relations and messaging for AAP I would be concerned that saying there is no mercury in vaccines would cause a liability to the AAP if the child gets hurt by the mercury in the vaccine.

 

A family was recently awarded millions of dollars in one of the first cases in federal vaccine court related to vaccines and autism.  That is just one case.  (It is not publicly known but there are 12 other cases.) I do not believe the AAP wants this type of liability for inaccuracies or not telling the entire truth about vaccines.

 

According to the FDA, other mercury containing vaccines (some of them used in children and pregnant or perspective mothers) include the DT vaccine (two of them by Sanofi Pasteur, Inc.), the DtaP vaccine (Tripedia2 Sanofi Pasteur, Inc), two TD vaccines (Mass Public Health and Sanofi Pasteur), the TT (Sanofi Pasteur), the Hep B (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals), the Hep A/Hep B, (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals), the Japanese Encephalitis (Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University), and the Meningococcal (Sanofi Pasteur) (1)

 

In summary, there are 16 vaccines with mercury including 5 commonly used in pediatrics and all of them commonly used multiple times throughout the lifetime of the individual.

 

Many of these vaccines are also injected into perspective mothers who, studies show, can pass mercury down to the child through both her umbilical cord and mother’s milk.

 

Pregnant women and breast-feeding women are also marketed the flu shots and that mercury can be considered a pediatric exposure (at least prenatal) since it is passed to the gestating or breast fed child.

 

 

 

 

Articles:

 

1. Attempts At Eradicating Infectious Diseases Are Putting Our Children At Risk

National Vaccine Information Center

By Barbara Loe Fisher, President, National Vaccine Information Center

 

2. MMR and the Simple Truth about Autism

Age of Autism Blog

By Dan Olmsted

February 7, 2008

 

3. What Did the CDC Know and When Did They Know It?

Age of Autism Blog

By Mark Blaxill

December 13, 2007

 

4. The Age of Autism: Pox — Part 1

By Dan Olmsted, UPI

April 19, 2006

 

5. In the Wake of Vaccines Mothering

By Barbara Loe Fisher

September-October 2004

 

6. Vaccines: The Overlooked Factors

Autism Research Institute

Bernard Rimland, Ph.D., President, Autism Research Institute

 

7. DAN! Vaccine Guidelines

Autism Research Institute

 

8. Putting Toddlers At Risk With Mandated Vaccines

American Association of Physicians and Surgeons Online

By Jane Orient, M.D., Executive Director, American Association of Physicians and Surgeons

9. Congressional Investigation of MercuryUS Rep. Dan Burton is the Senior Member on the Government Oversight and Reform Committee.  He has led a congressional hearing on the safety of vaccines with a focus on mercury in health care products including vaccines. 

The link below is to the report his committee published after a three year investigation about how vaccines and mercury in vaccines is likely to play a causal role in neurological disorders including autism.

Mercury in Medicine: Taking unnecessary risks

 

 

Books

 

1. What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Children’s Vaccinations

By Stephanie Cave

 

2. A Shot In The Dark

By Harris Coulter

 

3. The Vaccine Guide: Risks and Benefits for Children and Adults

By Randall Neustaeder

 

 

 

Links

 

1. National Vaccine Information Center

2. Vaccination News

3. Vacinfo.org

 

I found a great blog from The Whole Child: An Integrative Pediatrics Blog today and LOVE this idea.  With cinnamon having natural antibacterial properties (see Care2 for even more details), and the cold and flu season coming, our family needs all the help we can get.  I will definitely try this out.  See an excerpt from the blog below:

The Secret of Thieves

The NY Times “Really?” column today profiles cinnamon oil as a natural antibacterial, part of my home-made essential oil hand sanitizer recipe modeled on the infamous “Thieves” blend.  What is this “Secret of Thieves”?

Props to Young Living Essential Oils (YLEO), the company that has popularized “Thieves” as a natural alternative to chemical alcohol-based sanitizers.  Their blend is a patented mixture of cinnamon bark, clove, lemon, rosemary and eucalyptus oils.  I have adapted this blend of oils for use as a DIY hand sanitizer, adding 1-2 drops of each oil (but 5 drops of the lemon oil – or grapefruit or orange, if you prefer) to a small dispenser bottle filled with filtered water and 1 tsp aloe vera gel.  We use it at the Whole Child Center and it’s been the feature of my last 2 Earth Day presentations at my children’s school.   We even made a cute how-to video.

Nothing cuter than a flower in a little girl’s hair.  Here are some cute crafts to give give that little head of hair a little “bling”.

Thanks to WhipUp.net for this tutorial on making felt flowers—which would look adorable on a little barrett clippy you can buy at the craft stores, or on-line craft stores (for cheaper).

felt flower tutorial

What makes this flower so grand? It’s simple to make and crafted from sustainable products: eco-fi felt made of recycled plastic bottle and sweet vintage buttons. In no time at all, you’ll have a new felt posy for your wardrobe by following this simple tutorial. In fact, you’ll just have to be patient enough to allow the glue dry between steps.

Round up the supplies:
3 pieces of 9” x 12” Kunin eco-fi felt (also known as EcoSpun) in colors that suit your fancy (available at http://www.feltorama.com) :: Vintage buttons :: 1.5” pin back :: Scissors :: Fine-tipped marker for transferring petal patterns to felt :: Needle and thread for sewing buttons :: Thick craft glue (Beacon’s Felt Glue or Aleene’s Tacky Glue are good choices) :: Sewing pins

First: Print the petal template below and cut out the small petal and large petal. Print at actual size unless you’d like to change the dimensions to make a smaller or larger flower. It’s handy to print on heavy cardstock if you’d like to reuse the pattern to make an entire bouquet of recycled felt flowers!

Next: Fold each piece of felt in half and pin together around the perimeter. This will allow you to save time by cutting two petals at once. With a fine-tipped marker, trace 3 small petals on the first piece of doubled and pinned felt. Trace 3 large petals on the second piece of doubled and pinned felt. Trace 3 more large petals on the third piece of doubled and pinned felt.

Cut out each traced petal and you will end up with 6 small petals and 12 large petals. When cutting the petals, take care to cut just inside of the traced area to avoid any transfer markings on your petal pieces.

Then: Form each set of 6 petals into an overlapping circle. Next, carefully glue each petal to the adjacent petals. You will end up with 3 flower layers: one created from small petals, and two created from large petals. Each layer may tend to ‘cup’ upward slightly as you glue them. This will add more dimension to your finished flower. Allow each of the flower layers to dry according to manufacturer instructions.

Next: Once the 3 flower layers have dried, stack a layer of large petals on top of the second layer of large petals. Arrange the layers slightly askew so that the back layer of petals peek out between the top layer of petals. Glue these two layers together.

Stack the layer of small petals on top of the other layers. Again, arrange this layer slightly askew. Glue this top layer to the middle layer. Allow the 3 flower layers to dry according to manufacturer instructions. With a needle and thread, sew the vintage buttons to the center of the flower. Stack 2 or 3 vintage buttons together for extra charm!

Now: Turn the flower over. Cut a circle of felt to cover the center back of the flower. Glue the circle to the back of the flower and allow to dry according manufacturer instructions.

Cut a small square of felt to fit over the pin back. Glue this piece of felt over the pin back to the back of the flower. This will attach the pin back securely to the flower. Allow to dry according manufacturer instructions.

You’re done! Pin your new creation to a jacket, handbag or a fabric headband and show it off!

About the designer: April launched Felt-o-rama in 2008 after having difficulty finding online sources for wool felt in vibrant colors. Her passion for textiles began at a early age, thanks to her mom, and an antique treadle sewing machine, a lifelong crafting addiction was born.


And thanks to little window shoppe for this idea!  This would be great for parties, dress up, and Halloween fairies!!  Cute, cute…


How to Make Fairy Crowns

{By Vanessa ~ March 17, 2009}

This past weekend we celebrated my daughter’s 3rd birthday by throwing her a fairy party. We made fairy crowns for all of the little girls attending, they are very simple and inexpensive to put together.

birthday-party

Supplies

  • Green Floral Tape
  • Wire (floral wire, jewelry wire or you can even use pipe-cleaners or an old wire hanger)
  • Fake Flowers
  • Wire Cutters
  • Three different colors of ribbon

Instructions

instructions

  1. Cut the wire to the desired head circumference and twist together the ends to make a circle. If you have to thin of wire just double up on it.
  2. Next, wrap the wire in green floral tape.
  3. When you wrap the tape around the second time add in the flowers and leaves. These flowers I just picked up in the dollar bin at Wal-mart.
  4. Weave Flowers around the entire circle.
  5. Add your favorite ribbon. I took purple, pink and silver ribbon and used a yard of it for each headpiece.
  6. Finally, tie your ribbon in a loop knot to attach it to the crown.

fairy-crowns

I LOVE this craft, what a great gift or craft to do for your kids!!!  I will definitely add this to my list of crafts to make soon!!!  Thanks lovelydesign for this tutorial!

“homemade children’s books

These books are so incredibly simple and quick to make that I hope maybe you will make some for your little ones, too. They’d be great to kept in a small bag along with some crayons, ready for when you go out to a restaurant or coffee shop. Hopefully they can keep little ones occupied for even a short while!

monkey and dolphin books in + out by you.

Lately I’ve been wondering what to give to Adelaide’s little friends at her birthday party this coming Sunday. I really am not fond of purchasing items that are eventually going to end up in a dumpster somewhere, and so I wanted to try to give the children something that hopefully they will be able to use and enjoy beyond a sunday afternoon birthday party. And I also wanted to try and make the goodies myself using inexpensive materials that I had on hand.

Because I’ve had several parents ask me about Adelaide’s favourite crayons – a kind of children’s wax and oil based crayon from Japan – I got the idea to give out small packs of these crayons in the birthday goodie bags. And then I realised that I could make small children’s scribbler books to go along with them!

To make the scribble books, I first scanned in some animals from the pages of one of Adelaide’s colouring books that I picked up at Daiso for $2 but it is completely unmarked besides pictures and a bit of Japanese text. I wish that I made the illustrations myself – they are so very sweet! However, I did not due to lack of time and because these little books are for gifts and won’t be sold.

note-books for first scribbles by you.

After scanning in several animals – Monkeys, Dolphins, Squirrels, Lions, Otters, and Penguins – I made a layout simply in photoshop using the typefaces Giddyup and Neutraface. And I added alphabets in both capital and lower-case letters on the back cover, too. Once Designed, I printed out on my desktop printer many covers onto random coloured card stock pages.
For the insides, I chose simple multi-coloured paper, along with some kraft, manila, and interlined paper as well. I randomly sorted them in stacks of 8 sheets, and along with a cover folded them in half to make 16 page books. Then, using a long-armed stapler (which I simply asked to borrow from my mom’s work for a few days) I stapled the center fold line of each book twice.

I then added a length of librarian’s book tape to the spine. With an xacto knife, I measured out 3/4″ from the spine edge of the cover and marked two small marks with the blade. Then matching up the edge of the tape to the marks I laid the tape down, and then flipped and pressed it to the backside of the book. Last, using my Fiskars rotary paper cutter, I trimmed down the books to their final size – about 5×7″- and rounded the corners with my corner rounder. All Done!”

Hopefully this will give you a fun craft to do before you go on vacations this summer!

briar-3

My friend who is currently going through the adoption processes let me in on this gal who is also going through the process to adopt a little girl. Here’s what she said:

“Hi Friends,

As part of our adoption journey we’ve been able to connect with some amazing people who are also going through this process.  One of these family’s is the Deckers (Shelley and Robert).  They are just a few numbers behind us on the girl’s waiting list!  In an effort to raise funds for their adoption she started making hair accessories for girls.  Her website is below and is full of adorable, affordable cute accessories.  Some of you may not have girls yet, but I figure we all go to baby showers and need fun gift ideas.
For those of you who already have a barrette maker in your life, feel no pressure to switch- this is just a great way to help a family through the process of adoption!

www.briarclaire.etsy.com”

Also feel free to check out their blog for more information at http://asisterforthebean.blogspot.comHer website is full of cute, CUTE barrettes (some crocheted!) for GREAT prices.  BUT, on top of that (and helping a GREAT cause), through tomorrow, March 27, 2009 she is offering a buy 3 get the 4th free—-with no limit!!!  She also takes off the tax for shipping for that item.  What a great deal!!!  Go check her out!!!

briarclaire-barrettes1briar-2


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