Decor


I love this tutorial from Balancing Beauty and Bedlam!  When I had my daughter almost 2 years ago I was trying to figure out how to make one of these and gave up.now pregnant with my 3rd and will have to give this a try for this one.  But really—are you ever too old for one of these???  Maybe I’ll still make one for her—they’re gorgeous!  Thank you Balancing Beauty and Bedlam!

Pottery Barn Inspired Bedroom Decor November 30, 2009 Hearing that a post has inspired both creativity and frugality in one of my readers delights me to no end. When Cara emailed me that she had some Pottery Barn inspired bedroom decor and had conquered a Pottery Barn chandelier for under $10, I was delighted that she shared the pictures. Her ideas can be fitted to any number of varying decorating tastes. I am in the process (yes, the process has been stalled on quite a few occasions) of finishing my girls’ room with a PB inspired butterfly theme. I can’t wait to show you how an entire room makeover can happen for under $100 (with furniture). This butterfly chandelier is a wonderful start. Here is the original inspiration from the Pottery Barn, which is no longer sold. Considering that this gorgeous Chapiz Chandelier is selling for $129 right now, I am guessing, the butterfly one would not have fit into my frugal bedroom decor category. But Cara’s sure does!! Let’s see how you can make one of these Pottery Barn inspired chandeliers for less than ten dollars. Your daughters will love you for it. Supplies: Embroidery Hoop (only the solid hoop is needed; the hoop I used is about 14in in diameter) Twine / String Ribbon (1/2 inch or so width) Ribbon (thin) Beads Card stock Paper (I used 3 colors) Butterfly Template or punch (I wanted my butterflies to be about 3 inches wide – larger than any of my punches – so I used this template from Martha Stewart. Hot Glue Gun Ribbon Punch (optional – this is a tool I use for scrapbooking that punches out two slits for ribbons to feed through) (1) Take the embroidery hoop and tie a grid across it with the strings. I chose to do three strings in each direction. (You can see the grid in image directly below). Make sure to tie the strings tights. (2) Using the hot glue gun, wrap the ribbon around the hoop until it is completely covered, periodically gluing it so that the ribbon stays put. Once the hoop is covered, add two ribbons criss-crossing for hanging. (3) Cut out your butterflies. I opted for 36 butterflies in dark pink, pale pink, and white. Cut slits in the middle of the butterflies just wide enough for the thin ribbon to feed through. You want a tight fit so that the butterflies stay put on the ribbon. I used a ribbon punch, but you cut also just use scissors. You could also try using an adhesive if you have trouble getting the butterflies to stay, though you might want to wait until the end and the butterflies are exactly where you want them (4) Start assembling the butterflies on the thin ribbon, threading a few beads on the bottom to help weight each strand. You can add as many butterflies on each strand as you like for your design. For the chandelier effect, have a longer string in the middle and gradually have shorter strand toward the outside. Based on the size of my butterflies, I opted for four butterflies on my center strand (tied to the middle point of the grid). Then I had 4 strands of three butterflies, 4 strands of two butterflies, and 12 strands of one butterfly. I then used to three beads at the end of each strand. As a hint, find someplace to balance the hoop so you can look at the strands as you attach them to the grid. That way, you can play with the length you want. Since I tend to do crafts on my living room floor while watching TV, I brought in two of my kitchen chairs and balanced the hoop between the seats. That let me keep shifting things until I achieved the look I wanted. (5) After you have attached all the strands to the grid and have everything set, clip any excess ribbon from where you tied the strands and go hang your chandelier I hope you have enjoyed this beautifully frugal way to decorate your girl’s room. I know I sure did.

et beautiful letters designed by Jessica Hische at Daily Drop Cap.  She will be posting a new letter each day.  Beautify the ordinary!

I love, LOVE this idea from Jenny Garland—she’s so crafty I’m envious!  She modeled this stocking off of one from Ballard and it turned out really great.  Although I am not nearly as skilled, I think I’m going to take her tutorial here and give it a whirl.  Nothing sweeter than personalized, handmade Christmas stockings.  Thanks Jenny—this is AWESOME!

A Christmas Stocking Tutorial Just for YOU!

The Final Product

 

Ballard version

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

November 14th, 2009 1 Comment Sewing · Tutorials
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If you would like to make your own Ballard-esque Christmas stocking, here’s how to do it:

Materials:

  • 5/8 yd ivory duck cloth
  • 24″ x 7″ rectangle of leopard print cotton for ruffle
  • 12″ x 2″ rectangle of leopard print for loop
  • 12″ x 2″ rectangle of interfacing for loop
  • 8.5″ x 4.5″ scrap of cotton fabric for embroidered name (optional)
  • 8″ ball trim
  • red and green scraps of felt/cotton/flannel/etc for accents (circles, bones for dogs, or fish for cats)

Directions:

  1. Download pattern PDF and tape pieces together.
  2. Cut out (2) stocking pieces (front and back) from duck cloth.
  3. Cut out desired number of accents from red/green fabric and pin to front and back pattern pieces. Be sure to leave space on the front piece for the 8.5″ x 4.5″ rectangle if you are adding a name.
  4. Use a zigzag or decorative stitch to attach accents to stocking. Trim any part that hangs over.
  5. If adding a name, take your embroidered 8.5″ x 4.5″ rectangle. Press under 0.5″ on both the top and bottom. Pin to front of stocking and edge stitch top and bottom. Trim sides to match edges.                
  1. Serge or zigzag the top of the stocking (both front and back pattern pieces).                
  2. Sew trim to the top of the FRONT stocking piece with a 1/4″ seam.
  3. Place the front and back pattern pieces right sides together. Serge or sew around all sides, leaving the top open. Finish edges with a zigzag if you didn’t serge.
  4. Turn stocking right side out and press well.
  5. Take your 24″ x 7″ leopard fabric and sew short ends right sides together to create a tube.
  6. Press tube in half, wrong sides together. Edge stitch fold. Finish raw edge.
  7. Baste the bottom of the tube twice. Pull bobbin threads to create a ruffle the same perimeter as your stocking opening.          
  8. Slide the ruffle over the stocking opening, aligning raw edges.
  9. Sew ruffle to stocking with a 1/4″ seam allowance. 
  10. Press ruffle up. Edge stitch in place. 
  11. Now for the loop. Iron the 12″x2″ interfacing to the wrong side of the 12″x2″ leopard print fabric.
  12. Sew long sides, right side together. Turn tube right side out. Press. Edge stitch sides.
  13. Fold in half to make a loop and zigzag raw edges together. 
  14. Pin loop to the inside of the ruffle. Box stitch.  
  15. That’s it! (I just added this step because 20 steps sounds better than 19).

This tutorial on Living With Lindsay on how to make a Book Page Wreath is AMAZING!  What a cute, inexpensive, and EASY idea for decorating a corner of the house!  Thanks for the idea Lindsay!

Librarians, Please Avert Your Eyes When we came upon my now-favorite booth during our trip to the City-Wide Garage Sale, I think an audible gasp could have been heard from within our little shopping group. It was one of those booths that has something you want to buy in every square inch of space. I found a wonderful chippy side table exactly like I’ve been looking for, but the vendor wanted $50 and I wanted to pay more like $10. Thrifting has certainly spoiled me! At the same booth, we came across a pair of simple, but stunning wreaths made from book pages. The vendor told me that she made them sitting in front of the television. That’s my kind of crafting. I honestly don’t remember how much she wanted for these lovelies, but I think it was at least $40 a pop. Yeah, um, that’s way too rich for my blood. How about I show you how to make my version of the same wreath for just $2? Librarians and book lovers, please avert your eyes. Book Page Wreath Tutorial Supplies: •10″ foam wreath ($1 at Dollar Tree) •Paperback novel ($1 at Dollar Tree – depending on the length of the book, you may need two) •Brown and/or gray craft paint •Glue gun & glue sticks •Small strip of ribbon •A few paper towels •A few straight pins (optional) 1. Assemble your cast of characters. I felt slightly guilty about purchasing an author’s work from the Dollar Tree for the sole purpose of ripping up. I read a few pages of Loving Charity just to make sure I wasn’t about to destroy a literary classic; let me assure you that I wasn’t. You could definitely use vintage books, magazines or sheet music for this project or even select a book off of your own bookshelf that you don’t think you’ll read again. 2. Using the paper towels, I applied the brown paint to the edges of the book. I simply squirted some paint onto the towel and wiped it on the book. I painted the brown first and then applied a bit of gray. This will give your book pages a vintage look. To be honest, two colors aren’t completely necessary, so you can use just gray or just brown if you would like. Lay the book on a clean paper towel for about 5 or 10 minutes to let the paint dry. 3. Cut or tear a page out of the book and roll it in a method of your choosing. I put together a video tutorial to show you some different ways to roll the page if you are interested in seeing how I did it. The main thing to remember is that you want to roll the paper and not actually fold or crease it. 4. After rolling the page, apply some glue at the end of the roll and glue it to the wreath. Make sure that the painted edges are facing up. You will do this layer all the way around the wreath. When you have finished the full circle, flip the wreath over. That layer will become the bottom. If it won’t lay flat, put something heavy on top of it to flatten it out for a few minutes. 5. Continue rolling pages for your wreath. You will now fold a little tab on the bottom edge and apply glue only to that tab. Work your way from the bottom of the wreath up to the top, finishing one layer before moving to the next. 6. Once you get to the inside of the wreath, roll the paper and apply glue to the edge much like you did with the bottom layer. When you glue it on, the pages will be shorter than the wreath of the wreath. That’s okay. 7. At this point, your wreath will be mostly done, but there will be some sections you need to fill in. It should look roughly like this. To fill in your spaces, you’ll simply roll a page, apply glue to the ends, and just stick it in the wreath. The filler pages don’t necessarily need to touch the styrofoam wreath; they can stick to the pages already glued to the wreath if need be. Use the filler pages to fill in holes and add some height and visual interest to your wreath. 8. After I was finished filling in, I flip your wreath over and glue your scrap of ribbon on the back to serve as a hanger. I stuck a few straight pins in it to make sure it held tight to the wreath, but that’s purely optional if you glue it on well. All that’s left to do now is to find a spot to hang your new creation!

My sister-in-law sent me these links about applying fabric to walls as an alternative to paint or wallpaper.  Very cute idea, even for smaller objects that you want to dress up like this toy box—very cute!  Here are the goods from Sew Can Do:

Toy Box Redo: Plain to Punchy


I had this really great vintage toy box from my childhood nursery, but the stark white seemed too blah. I thought about painting it, but they don’t make no-VOC spray paint, so that was kind of out. Then I remembered reading about applying fabric to walls with liquid starch and thought why not try it on the toy box?


It worked like a dream! Super easy to apply and virtually goof-proof, since it’s easy to adjust when wet.

Here’s how to do it:

– Get some liquid starch (available at any grocery store)
– Apply with a paintbrush directly to the fabric and then apply wet fabric to hard surface.
– Smooth it out with your hands to remove any wrinkles or air bubbles and adjust position if needed
– Do another layer of starch over it with the brush again.

The best part is that it’s easy to remove without damaging either the fabric or the item underneath.


I loved how it worked out so much I took the leftover scraps and carefully cut out the shapes and applied them to the wall to add some design to my new peach paintjob. I didn’t like the positions of a few of the shapes on the wall, so I just peeled them off and reapplied the same way – no mess or damage at all! You can even wash the fabric to reuse for something else later. The ultimate recycling project;) I wish I’d have learned about this trick years ago when I fiddled around with messy stencils and stamps as wall art – they never turned out half as nice either.

And here is the nitty-gritty from Rental Decorating Digest:

If being budget conscious is necessary for you, understand that fabric prices vary and could actually run into quite a bit of money depending on your tastes – this can be easily remedied by discount fabric stores and clearance sales.

The good news is when you remove the fabric from the wall, all you will need to do is wash it. It can be easily re-used for another craft project, good as new!

Keeping all that in mind – let’s get busy.  These simple instructions will help you apply and remove your fabric.


Materials:

  • LINIT® Starch OR LINIT® Starch-n-Crafts™ Stiffener
  • Fabric
  • Clean sponge or paint roller
  • Pan

Process:

  1. Wash the wall to remove any dirt or film.

  2. Lightweight fabrics, such as polished cottons, ginghams, and chintzes, are easiest to use. Measure from the floor to the ceiling and add a couple extra inches.

  3. Cut the fabric accordingly. If fabric has a design, be sure to match the design before cutting the next panel as when using wallpaper.

  4. Pour starch into a clean pan or paint pan or spray on if using stiffener (see Tip section if using spray stiffener). Apply starch to the top half of the wall with a sponge, paint roller or spray on if using spray stiffener.

  5. Smooth fabric into place at the top of the wall, leaving about one inch to be trimmed later. Use push pins to hold the fabric temporarily in place. Apply more starch going down the wall as needed until you get to the floor, leave approximately one inch overlap at floor level.

  6. Apply starch to the top of the fabric, brushing and smoothing the fabric in place to remove bubbles and wrinkles. Be sure the starch penetrates the fabric evenly.

  7. Work your way down the panel, continuing to sponge or spray starch onto the wall, smoothing the fabric, and applying more starch.

  8. Position the second panel, matching the design along the edge. Repeat steps.

  9. Around windows and doors, leave a one inch overlap as with the ceiling and floor.

  10. Fabric overlap should be cut when the fabric is completely dry. It will then cut clean and easily and any shrinkage will have occurred before you trim.

When Using Stiffener in Spray Bottle: Be sure to mask edges of ceiling & floor to avoid over spray. To Remove Fabric From Wall: Peel one corner loose, then gently begin to peel the fabric off of the wall panel by panel. If the fabric does not peel easily, dampen the fabric with water using a wet sponge and it should come right off.

Whether you choose to cover your entire wall or only a portion, you will enjoy the look of a professionally decorated room, without the permanence of paint or wallpaper!




I love these ideas, I wish I had known about the vellum idea for my wedding—how beautiful!!!!  Also, the accordian idea I LOVE—I am putting it on my craft list now.  Thank you Martha and the crafs dept. for this!

I love this idea for using your photos (printed on vellum) as a glowing summer centerpiece. Get the full how to here.—–

If you’re throwing a party for someone’s anniversary or birthday, the guest of honor will shine with a set of photo frame lanterns. They consist of three hinged photo frames set around votive candles. The black-and-white photos are printed onto ecru-colored vellum paper, which is translucent enough for the images to be visible by candlelight.

Photo Centerpiece How-To
Disassemble three like-sized frames, setting aside their fronts and discarding their backings. Paint or stain wooden frames desired color; let dry. Upload or scan photographs into a computer. With editing software, make the images black and white, and resize them to fit your frames. Print them onto vellum paper with an ink-jet printer. Slip the images into the frames. Using cloth tape, hinge frames together to form a triangle. Stand frames around a candle in a protective glass holder.

Sources
Colored bookbinding tape; $1.75 per foot; NY Central Art Supply; 800-950-6111 or nycentralart.com.—-

I’ve always loved the sophisticated look of this accordion frame. The photos are printed out on matte inkjet paper and glued to art boards. It’s so simple, but looks like a real work of art. See the how-to for attaching the hinges and mounting the photos here.—-

These frameless photographs are mounted on sturdy art boards and linked by small hinges for an accordion structure. Color and black-and-white snapshots, portraits, and still lifes add to the effect.

Tools and Materials
Small craft brushes
Acrylic craft paint
Precut 5 3/4-by-7 3/4-inch art boards
Decoupage glue
Ruler and pencil
T pin
Screwdriver
Small hinges and screws

Accordion Gallery How-To
Use as many art boards as you like, applying pictures to one or both sides of each panel.

1. On a computer, resize photographs to 5 3/4 by 7 3/4 inches, and print them.

2. Using a small craft brush and the acrylic paint, paint the edges of each board. Let dry.

3. Position one picture on one face of each board. Using another small craft brush, apply decoupage glue to back of each photograph. Attach to a board; let dry. Glue images to reverse sides of boards if desired.

4. Decide upon an order for the photos. Use pencil to mark the placement of the hinges. (Ours were 1 3/4 inches from the top and the bottom of each board and aligned with one edge).

5. With the T pin, bore small holes through the boards where screws will go (this will make it easier to insert the screws). Using a screwdriver, attach the hinges, and link the boards to one another.

So I know, we just got into summer, and no, I’m not trying to rush it… I just have had these crafts bookmarked and I wanted to get them on there so I would remember try them out this year (along with finishing my 3 year project of working on the wreath).

This one is Thanks to Martha Stewart:

Shimmering Stacked Trees

Shimmering Stacked Trees

From:

Martha Stewart Show

This shimmering stacked tree will add a festive — and eco-friendly — touch to your home this holiday season. These magnificent trees can also be stacked using any leftover aluminum foil, felt, or crepe paper.

Tools and Materials
4 ounces Sculpey clay
10-inch, 6mm thick knitting needle
Felt
Craft glue
Clear glass glitter
Receipt spike (optional)
2 pieces 6-by-6-inch card stock
Newspaper
Utility knife
Bone folder
Adhesive spray
Hot-glue gun and glue
2 paper Dresden stars

Stacked Tree How-To
1. Roll and flatten 4 ounces sculpting clay to form dome shape. Poke knitting needle horizontally through flat area of clay dome. Remove knitting needle.

2. Bake clay in oven at 275 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes. Reinsert needle into baked clay. Glue felt on bottom of base for surface protection.

3. Apply glue, then glitter, to the base. A receipt spike can be used to create a smaller tree instead of building a base using the above instructions.

4. To form tree, place 2 pieces of 6-by-6-inch card stock onto spike for stability.

5. Cut newspaper into 50 sheets of each size:
-6 by 6 inches
-5 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches
-5 by 5 inches
-4 1/2 by 4 1/2 inches
-4 by 4 inches
-3 1/2 by 3 1/2 inches
-3 by 3 inches
-2 1/2 by 2 1/2 inches
-2 by 2 inches
-1 1/2 by 1/2 inch

6. Cut 25 1-inch sheets of newspaper.

7. Begin poking pieces of newspaper onto spike in descending order, folding and unfolding each piece of paper using a bone folder.

8. Spray tree with adhesive and immediately sprinkle with diamond dust. Set aside and let dry for 10 minutes.

9. Using a hot-glue gun, adhere 2 paper Dresden stars back-to-back to top of tree.

Resources
Paper Dresden stars and clear glass glitter can be found at D. Blumchen and Company, Martha’s Secret Source for vintage-inspired holiday decorations and crafting supplies. A receipt spike can be found at restaurant-supply stores. Knitting needles and clay can be purchased from most crafts stores.

And here is a gorgeous pinecone ornament courtesy of Inkspirations, thank you for teaching us how to do this!

It’s HERE!!!!!!! Tutorial for Pinecone Balls

Okay, due to the overwhelming demand for directions, I decided to do this a little earlier than I planned because SERIOUSLY you guys are all overloading my email box. I really hope you “get” them and that at the end of this tutorial you all will be happily playing with your pretty christmas ball. Bear with me, this will be my first time ever doing this . . .

INGREDIENTS:

1 sheet of 12×12 paper (or a couple if you like)
1 three inch foam ball (white foam kind)
1 package of pins (I use Applique pins – 19mm – you can get these at walmart)
1 length of ribbon (I prefer wide SU organdy)
1 thimble
1 paper cutter

STEP 1
Choose your paper(Mine is by K&I Memories). Small prints or loud paper work best when choosing which paper to use. As I learned with this one, white is not always the best color to have in the background. Once you have decided, cut the paper into 1 inch x 2 inch pieces (rectangles), the entire sheet.

STEP 2
Fold your papers to make a point (see picture). Both corners meet in the middle.

STEP 3
Pin points down on center of ball. Put all points together. Folds should be on the underside where they cannot be seen.

STEP 4
Pin down the other corner points on this first row, so that all three points of each triangle are pinned in on the first row. You will ONLY do this for the first row.

STEP 5
Begin row 2 by pinning down the two ends (not the main point) You center the main point on one of the lines, so that the base of the triangle is offset to the original pinned row. Then leave the point unpinned (this forms the pinecone like look) and pin down two other sides. Repeat this row over and over until you reach the halfway point (clear as mud? Maybe the pictures will help – I hope . . . )

STEP 6
At the halfway point, pin in your ribbon. I like to stick about 4 pins on each end. If you pin the ribbon in now, leave enough at the top to form a hanger. You are going to continue to work the paper over the ribbon, which will make it secure.

STEP 7
Continue rows up until you reach the top. As you near the top, it will become increasingly harder to push the pins into the ball and through your papers — this is where that thimble comes in handy. You will also probably run out of paper as you reach the top, or if you used 2 sheets of 12×12, will have used up 1/2 of each sheet.

STEP 8
Tie bow at top and add any extra ribbon you would like. “Pretty it up” You are done. Hang ball on your tree and enjoy. If you have any questions, please post them in the comments section of this post and I will reply to them in that location. This will keep me from getting a bazillion emails asking the same questions. Thanks *smiles*

Here is another link for this craft from Stamping Starlette!

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